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Bristol 'Festival of Stone' 2013

Bristol ‘Festival of Stone’ carving competition

This public stone carving competition made an interesting change from woodcarving. It was also a chance to carve alongside my brother Duncan Park, who works with stone.

 

Duncan and Alistair Park

 

I wouldn’t say that my piece was anywhere near the standard of many of the other competitors, but tackling an accurate portrait in a fairly unfamiliar material, in public, to a tight deadline was challenge enough! It was great fun and the weather was fantastic too.

wooden rabbit carving

Sign for Rock Meadows Housing Development

This cedar log was carved as a sign for Rock Meadow, a housing development of affordable housing in the Forest of Dean, in Gloucestershire. It shows animals and plants found in the local area, including orchids, wild daffodils, a shrew, rabbits and dormice.

 

Rock Meadow housing sign

 

There are also carved rocks on it, reflecting the name of the development. The bottom of the log, below the band of carved ‘rocks’, was uncarved except for slots as it was to be sunk into a concrete base when fitted on site. Cedar is a durable timber, so the sign will hopefully last for a while outdoors.

 

carved cedar log

 

How many animals and plants can you spot in the photos?

 

carved cedar sign for housing development

 

 

‘Woodlands for all’ project 2008

This project (with limited time and budget to complete it) was carved during May 2008 for the ‘Forest of Avon Trust‘, an organisation in Bristol that seek to promote the use of local woodlands in environmentally sustainable ways.

Four posts were sited at Jubilee Stone Wood near Backwell, on the edge of the Mendip Hills. Four others were fixed in at West Tanpit Wood, near Lower Failand and across the Avon gorge from Bristol. All eight posts were shallow-relief carved using long-lasting sweet chestnut logs, with designs chosen by young people and people with special needs from the area.

West Tanpit Wood

These posts stand a bit over 5 feet (1.5m) tall and mark a short circular route through the woods. If walking in early summer, the woods suddenly turn from being carpeted with the white flowers of wild garlic to the deep blue of native British bluebells – very beautiful indeed.

 

West Tanpit woods

 

A bird called a Dipper (which can sometimes be seen running about in the stream next to this post)

carved wooden dipper bird

 

Bluebells and Bumble bee

bluebells and bumble bee

 

Fern by a stream (before leaving the workshop)

wooden carved fern leaf

 

Oak leaves, acorns and a logpile, symbolising the two halves of the wood- native deciduous trees and commercial softwood plantation.

 

carved marker post

 

Jubilee Stone Wood

 

Jubilee Stone wood

 

Early Purple Orchid with Silver Washed Fritillary butterfly

carved orchid and butterfly

 

Robin singing on Ivy (before leaving the workshop)

carved robin and ivy

 

Sunset over Nailsea- the view next to this post

jubilee stone wood post

Carved panels using braille 2016

These oak panels, featuring braille as part of their design, are part of a permanent installation at the Brunel building in Southmead hospital – a major healthcare facility in Bristol.

Initially, the commission was to make an artwork that would include words and phrases chosen by patient’s knitting and writing groups as being important to them. As part of the making process there also had to be an opportunity for patients, visitors and staff to try their hand at carving parts of it during two hospital open days.

 

woodcarving the braille panel at Southmead hospital

 

On visiting Southmead, I realised that most wall-hung artworks there didn’t really give much opportunity for blind or partially-sighted people to interact with them. They were mainly prints behind glass.

Working with guidance from local braille users, together with organisations and blind artists from around the country (particularly Alan Michael Rayner), I designed a touch sculpture that also includes braille as a fundamental part. The Bristol Braillists group were particularly helpful with this area of the project. Paul and Hazel from the group even visited my workshop to give help and advice on the design.

 

making a sculpture for blind people

 

Eventually, the installation developed into three panels. The largest one shows the patient’s groups knitting and writing, together with a carver (who might that be?). The knitting, writing and carving is spilling off the table to become a landscape with the important words and phrases written on it. In the top right-hand corner are well-known buildings in Bristol. Above it all is a description in braille, made from brass pins that have been fixed into the oak.

 

braille woodcarving

 

The second panel shows a much smaller version of the main panel (a bit bigger than A4 size), with different features labelled in braille. This was suggested by Camilla at Living Paintings, who pointed out that blind people can get ‘lost’ when feeling their way through a large area. This small orientation panel allows visitors who are using touch to work out where they are going on the larger artwork.

 

braille on woodcarving

 

The third panel is a key to Grade one braille, so that sighted visitors who would like to work out what the braille on the other panels says can do so. There are several types of braille, with grade one being the simplest – a letter-by-letter translation. This inspired some discussion about whether it was the best form to use, as most British braillists use Grade two braille which is quicker to type out and to read. However, most users felt that people who weren’t so confident in reading braille and those from other countries would find this form easier to understand.

 

grade one braille key

 

Once the panels had been fitted in March 2016, the installation was unveiled by the Chief Executive of NHS South-west, Andrea Young. She is standing in the centre of the photo below with Ruth, the arts director for Southmead, standing to the left of the picture. It was great to see that Paul and Hazel, who had helped in the design, could make it to the unveiling too.

 

south mead hospital braille artwork

 

I really appreciated the opportunity to explore new ways of interaction with public carved sculpture but also being given the chance to find out more, as a sighted person, about how blind and partially sighted people interact with the world around them. I hope that the things learnt can be incorporated into future projects and thank you to everyone who generously gave their time to help me with practical advice and suggestions.